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Conservation Ecology

The Conservation Ecology Division deals with research and monitoring activities pertaining to fields in ecology, biodiversity and conservation of natural resources in the country. The division has the expertise to conduct advanced research on `wildlife population monitoring, habitat ecology, species interactions, animal movement, and species distribution under land use change’. The division provides field practical training on wildlife census in various Protected Areas and conducts workshops on capacity building for Protected Area Managers, to develop practical solutions towards species and habitat conservation. Presently, our primary focus is on endemic and threatened birds in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the large carnivore-Human conflict issues in the Western Ghats. Through our research, we are on a mission to identify conflict related issues in biodiversity hot-spots to scientifically develop and implement species and habitat recovery programs.

Dr. MANCHI SHIRISH S Senior Scientist
Interest: I am a conservation biologist. I support designing the participatory conservation programs through research. I would like to continue answer the questions related to conservation strategy designing and implementation. I am of the opinion to target the priority species (Specially Threatened Birds) first but I am also curious to know the true status of the birds are and can be under threat before prioritizing the species. Presently, I am more inclined towards understanding the raptors in India. I would like to continue my work on caves and cave fauna as the information in this regard is meager. Contact: manchishirish@sacon.in

Dr. T. Ramesh Scientist

Research Focus

My research approach bridges habitat ecology, conservation ecology, and population ecology to address critical issues related to large carnivore conservation. My research addresses the impact of habitat fragmentation and associated anthropogenic pressure on carnivore population, prey – predator interactions, predator coexistence patterns and spatial movement ecology. Loss of habitat connectivity, human persecution (poisoning), poaching and direct anthropogenic pressure has caused tiger and other co-predators to decline/disappear from many of their former ranges. Tiger, leopard, wild dog and striped hyena had a wider distribution range in the past but in recent times, they are restricted to small and fragmented areas bounded by a growing human population. This has led to continuous conflicts between the local community and large carnivores mainly due to livestock depredation. Further, carnivore populations that are in continuous contact with village/rural settlements and domestic livestock could remain under stress. Therefore human-wildlife conflict issues and its effect on wildlife health are crucial to address in human-dominated landscapes of India. My current research focuses on the impact of human pressure on conservation of threatened species and their habitats through species monitoring and I believe that direct conservation applications must include the involvement of local people and policy makers. Therefore my research on large carnivores provides a comprehensive understanding on human-wildlife conflicts for formulating management plans to reduce human-large carnivore conflicts in the future.

Contact: ramesh81ngl@gmail.com


GAYATHRI V

Interests: My broad scale interests lie in Ecology, Conservation and Toxicology. I did my undergrads in B. Tech- Bio-medical engineering, nevertheless my passion for wildlife and conservation drove me to pursue my Masters in Wildlife biology from A.V.C College. Following my Masters, I did research in toxicology, coastal habitats, Western Ghats and climate change. My interests include movement patterns of large mammals, socio-economic factors involving human-wildlife conflict, prey-predator interaction, and human-wildlife interactions.

Current work: I am currently working as Project Fellow in a project entitled “Assessing anthropogenic threats to large mammals (Tiger, Leopard, Asiatic-wild dog, Sloth bear, Indian gaur, and Asiatic elephant) population in Western Ghats part of Tamil Nadu, southern India”. Global populations of several species are on decline due to various natural and anthropogenic factors. Ever increasing developmental activities to satisfy the needs of the growing human population often end up with habitat degradation and habitat fragmentation. Large mammals have large range size thus often overlap with the human dominated areas and under such circumstances cause human-wildlife conflict. In several cases of conflict such as livestock depredation, crop and property damage and loss of human lives, humans often retaliate by killing the conflict animals. It is thus imperative to understand the drivers of human-animal conflict and effective ways to mitigate it in order to conserve large mammals. My prime focus is to look at the trends in conflict across the landscape- spatial and temporal variations and various drivers of man-animal conflict in this locality, which will help to identify the priority zone and in developing mitigation measures for human-wildlife conflict at National and Regional levels.

Contact:gayathrivenkatramanan91@gmail.comgayathri.v@sacon.in


Amruta Dhamorikar, Junior Research Biologist
I am presently working as Junior Research Biologist on the project “Conservation of Edible-nest Swiftlet in Andaman and Nicobar Islands”. I have a Master’s degree in Biodiversity – Monitoring and Utilization from Savitribai Phule Pune University. My keen interest lies in ecology, animal behaviour and wildlife conservation. Presently, my work in the Andaman Islands involves the study of the cave-dwelling Edible-nest Swiftlet and the unique biodiversity found in the cave ecosystem. The Edible-nest Swiftlet is a small yet essential bird to the Andaman Islands because of its economic value. Anthropogenic pressures on the breeding of this bird have put the populations on a decline, and hence a conservation program is in action. The on-going conservation work focuses on bringing back the population of the bird through in-situ as well as ex-situ techniques. My research also involves the study of other species living in the caves, especially the invertebrates. Through my research, I hope to add to the presently-lacking information on cave fauna and bring to the world’s attention the wonders that caves in India hold.

Dhanusha Jaywant Kawalkar, Junior Research Biologist
Having pursued my under graduation in Social work and Masters in Wildlife conservation Action, I have been always interested in working on the social dynamics of Wildlife conservation and its related aspects. Started of my career on studying tigers, understanding human-snake conflict in central Indian landscape and trade dynamics of illegal wildlife trade in northern Western Ghats to currently looking at the 2D and 3D cave modelling and mapping them. My core interests are in occupancy modelling and mapping. However, the Edible-nest Swiftlet Conservation project is my first project inclined towards birds and would love to continue doing research in birds and their related conservation concerns.

Deepika Chettri, Junior Research Biologist
I come from the subtle hills of the eastern Sub-Himalayas-Meghalaya. As a teenager, I was intrigued by the stories of my grandparents who spoke of the changing environment, the disappearance of wildlife and forest cover by the decade. It was this concern that led me to understand the social dynamics and the elements of the environment, which leads to environmental changes motivating me to take up a Masters degree in Environmental Science, after a Graduate degree in Biotechnology. I am currently engaged as a Junior Research Biologist in the project entitled- “In-situ and Ex-situ Conservation of Endemic Andaman Edible-nest Swiftlet in the Andaman and Nicobar Island”, Andaman which is a home to a wonderful creature, Edible-nest Swiftlet residing at the limestone caves of the island has a very unique feature that leads to its downfall too, making humans to go onto an uncontrolled harvesting spree. My focus lies on understanding the limestone cave ecosystem and the role it has to play as a habitat for the swiftlet, by initially understanding the biodiversity and distribution of the cave flora in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Contact:karkideepika1@gmail.com

Asit Kumar Behera, Inspire Fellow

I am primarily interested in the field of Conservation Ecology and Wildlife biology. I completed my BS-MS integrated dual degree course from IISER-Kolkata in Biological Sciences. After completing my Masters, my passion for Wildlife drove me towards the Nicobar Islands where I worked as an intern in a project of University of Mysore to mitigate conflict between human and Long-tailed Macaque. This internship and couple of volunteering positions gave me the perfect opportunity to harness my skill in outdoor and observational skills, and the ability to work alone for lengthy periods. I’m also interested in conservational biology, ethology, population ecology, community ecology, species-habitat relationship & human-wildlife conflict.

Current work: Currently, I am affiliated to Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History (SACON) as an Inspire Fellow. For my PhD, I am working on the topic “Landscape level patterns of mammalian assemblages in Bellary district, Karnataka” where I am studying how habitat loss and fragmentation caused due to anthropogenic disturbances is affecting the mammalian species assemblage. I am also studying the behavioural changes in prey and subordinate predators due to the presence of apex predators in ecosystem. Through this study, I am expecting to provide information on fine-scale habitat structure determining the habitat requirement of the mammalian species across land use gradients, which will help in prioritizing areas requiring immediate protection for species conservation. This study will also put light on the prominent role played by large carnivores in the ecosystem.

Contact: asit.vicky@gmail.com


Ongoing :

  • Understanding Dispersal Patterns in the monomorphic Edible-nest Swiftlet of Andaman Islands using biotechnological tools
  • Assessing anthropogenic threats to large carnivore population in the Western Ghats part of Tamil Nadu
  • In-situ and Ex-situ Conservation of the Endemic Andaman Edible-nest Swiftlet in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India

Completed :

  • Conservation of the Andaman Serpent-eagle Spilornis elgini in the Andaman Islands: Phase – I
  • Patterns of distribution of selected faunal groups in the Agasthiamalai Hills, Western Ghats, Kerala, India
  • Strengthening community conservation efforts in Nagaland. A programme to impart technical support on biodiversity conservation and livelihood options to communities. Phase I: Phek, Tuensang, Kiphere, Longleng and Mon districts. Programme co-ordinators: Mr. Venkota Nakro & Dr. Ravi Sankaran (S. Bhupathy & PA Azeez, since Feb 2009), Sir Dorabji Tata Trust, (2007-2010) Rs. 287.13 lakhs.
  • Ecology of the endangered Indian Rock Python, Python molurus in KNP, Bharatpur. Ministry of Environment and Forests (2007-2010) Rs. 11.6 lakhs.
  • A Study on the Herpetofaunal Communities of the Upper Vaigai Plateau, Western Ghats. Ministry of Environment and Forests (2006-2009). Rs.10.37 lakhs.
  • An ecological study on mammals, birds, herpetofauna and butterflies in Teesta river basin, Sikkim. Carrying capacity study of Teesta basin in Sikkim. Investigators: Drs. Lalitha Vijayan, Ajith Kumar & S. Bhupathy. National Hydro Power Corporation (2003-07). 48 lakhs.
  • Status of sea turtle populations on the Tamil Nadu and Kerala coasts. In: Towards an integrated and collaborative sea turtle conservation programme in India: Tamil Nadu & Kerala. UNEP-CMS- IOSEA- MCBT (2005-06). 2.5 lakhs.
  • Biodiversity monitoring of Anaikatti Reserve Forest – a long-term study on the ecology of a dry mixed deciduous forest. Herpetofauna component. SACON R& D Fund (2002-2005). 4 lakhs
  • Status of Olive Ridley sea turtle along the Indian coast: Tamil Nadu. UNDP-WII-GOI (2001-2002). 2.5 lakhs.
  • Impact of habitat alterations on the reptile diversity in the higher altitudes of Upper Nilgiris, NBR, Western Ghats. Ministry of Environment and Forests (1999-2003). 5.0 lakhs.
  • Monitoring of Indian Python in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur. SACON R & D Fund. Dec. 1999- April 2000. 0.35 lakhs.
  • Status of endemic lizards (Family: Agamidae) in the Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu. World Wide Fund for Nature-India, New Delhi (1994-95). 1.5 lakhs.
  • Status and distribution of the River Terrapin Batagur baska in the Sunderbans of India. IUCN/SSC & American Museum Natural History, USA (Jan-May 1994). 2.5 laks.

2011-2018

  1. Mane A. M. and Manchi S. S. In-press. Roosting patterns of the edible-nest swiftlet Aerodramusfuciphagus of the Andaman Islands: effects of lunar phase and breeding chronology. Emu, DOI: 10.1080/01584197.2017.1336065.
  2. Mane A. M. and Manchi S. S. 2017. Physical and Environmental Characteristics based Classification oftheCavesof theAndaman Islands. Ambient Science, 4 (1): 82-87.
  3. Mukherjee A., Pilakandy R., Kumara H. N., Manchi S. S., andBhupathy S. 2017. Burrow characteristics and its importance in occupancy of burrow dwelling vertebrates in Semiarid area of Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan, India. Journal of Arid Environments, 141: 7-15.
  4. Manchi S.S. 2015. Visual Impact of Tectonic Movements on the Caves in Andaman Islands. Ambient Science. 02 (2): 39-41.
  5. Shirish Manchi, Asad Rahmani and Dhritiman Mukherjee. Grey-faced Buzzard Butastur indicus: First record from India. Journal of Bombay Natural History Society. 111 (1): 45.
  6. Manchi S. S. and R. Sankaran. 2014. Effect of Protection on White-nest Swiftlet Aerodramus fuciphagus population in Andaman Islands, India – an assessment, Oryx. 48 (2): 213-217.
  7. Manchi S. S. and Kumar J. S. 2014. Sighting of the Blue-winged Pitta Pitta moluccensis on Narcondam Island, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Indian Birds. 9 (1): 23-24.
  8. Ramesh, T., Kalle, R., Sankar, K., Qureshi, Q., Giordano, A.J., Gayathri, V., and Downs, C.T., 2018. To resettle or not?: Socioeconomic characteristics, livelihoods and perceptions in resolving human-tiger conflict in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, India. Journal of Environmental Management (Provisionally Accepted). Impact Factor: 4.10.
  9. Smith,Y.C.E., Smith, D.A.E., Si, X., Kalle, R., Ramesh, T. and Downs, C.T. 2018. Multifaceted avian diversity loss after forest fragmentation of a naturally heterogeneous landscape. Journal of Biogeography (Provisionally Accepted). Impact Factor: 4.30.
  10. Mhlanga, M., Ramesh, T., Kalle, R., Ngosi, E.D. and Downs, C.T. 2018. Comparison of spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) prey in a hunting area and a protected area in western Zimbabwe.African Journal of Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/aje.12499. Impact Factor: 1.0.
  11. Kalle, R., Ramesh, T. and Downs, C.T. 2017. When and where to move: Dynamic occupancy models explain the range dynamics of a food nomadic bird under climate and land cover change. Global Change Biology. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13861. Impact Factor: 8.50.
  12. Ramesh, T., Kalle, R.,Rosenlund, H. and Downs, C.T. 2017. Low leopard populations in protected areas of Maputaland: a consequence of poaching, habitat condition, abundance of prey and a top predator. Ecology and Evolution 7:1964–1973. Impact Factor: 2.54.
  13. Ramesh, T., Kalle, R. and Downs, C.T. 2017. Staying safe from top predators: patterns of co-occurrence and inter-predator interactions.Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 71:1-14. Impact Factor: 2.42
  14. Smith, D.A.E., Smith,Y.C.E., Ramesh, T. and Downs, C.T. 2017. Camera-trap data elucidate habitat requirements and conservation threats to an endangered forest specialist, the Spotted Ground Thrush (Zoothera guttata). Forest Ecology and Management 400:523–530. Impact Factor: 3.10
  15. Smith, Y.C.E., Smith, D.A.E., Ramesh, T. and Downs, C.T. 2017. Forest habitats in a mixed urban-agriculture mosaic landscape: patterns of mammal occupancy. Landscape Ecology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-017-0580-1. Impact Factor: 3.61
  16. Smith, Y.C.E., Smith, D.A.E., Ramesh, T. and Downs, C.T. 2017.The importance of microhabitat structure in maintaining forest mammal diversity and abundance in a mixed land-use mosaic. Biodiversity and Conservation. DOI 10.1007/s10531-017-1360-6. Impact Factor: 2.26.
  17. Chibesa, M., Taylor, B., Ramesh, T. and Downs, C.T. 2017. Home range and habitat use of Trumpeter Hornbills in an urban-forest mosaic, Eshowe, South Africa.Ostrich. http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/00306525.2017.1292561. Impact Factor: 1.0
  18. Bhupathy, S., G. Srinivas,N. Sathish Kumar, M. Murugesan, S. Babu, R. Suganthasakthivel & P. Sivakumar 2012. Diversity and conservation of selected biota of the Megamalai landscape, Western Ghats. India. Current Science 102(4): 590-595.
  19. Bhupathy, S. & A.M.A. Nixon 2011. Status of reptiles in Upper Nilgiris, Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, Western Ghats, India. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 108(2): 103-108.
  20. Basundhara Chettri, Bhoj Kumar Acharya and S. Bhupathy (2011). An Overview of the Herpetofauna of Sikkim with Emphasis on Elevational Distribution Pattern and Threats and Conservation Issues. Pp: 233-254. In Biodiversity of Sikkim – Exploring and Conserving a Global Hotspot (Eds. M. L. Arrawatia and Sandeep Tambe). Information and Public Relations Department, Government of Sikkim.
  21. Deepak V., Ramesh, M., Bhupathy, S. & Vasudevan, K. 2011. Indotestudo travancorica (Gray 1830) – spotted pond turtle, black pond turtle. In: Rhodin, A.G.J., Pritchard, P.C.H., van Dijk, P.P., Saumure, R.A., Buhlmann, K.A., Iverson, J.B., and Mittermeier, R.A. (Eds.). Conservation Biology of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises: A Compilation Project of the IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group. Chelonian Research Monographs No. 5, pp. 043.1–043.6, doi:10.3854/crm.5.054. travancorica.v1.2011,http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/cbftt/.
  22. Bhupathy, S., G. Srinivas, N. Sathishkumar, T. Karthik & A. Madhivanan 2011. Herpetofaunal mortality due to vehicular traffic in the Western Ghats, India: A case study. Herpetotropicos 5(2): 119-126.

2005-2010

  1. Manchi S. S. Records of the Andaman Barn-owl Tyto deroepstorfii in North-, and Middle Andaman Islands. Indian Birds. 8 (3): 66–67.
  2. Pankaj Koparde and Manchi S. S. Avifaunal Records from Chalis Ek, North Andaman Island: Insights into Distribution of Some Andaman Island Birds, Check List. 9(1): 034–041.
  3. Manchi S. S. and R Sankaran. 2010. Foraging habits and habitat requirments of the Edible-nest Swiftlet and the Glossy Swiftlet in the Andaman Islands. Wilson Journal of Ornithology. 122 (2): 259-272.
  4. Manchi S. S. and R. Sankaran. 2009. Impact of the great earthquake of 2004 on limestone caves in North and Middle Andaman Islands, India. Current Science. 97: 1230-1234.
  5. Manchi S. S. and R. Sankaran. 2009. Predators of swiftlets and their nests in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Indian Birds. 5(4): 118-120
  6. Prasanth Narayanan and Manchi S. S.. 2007. Sighting of Malabar Whistling-Thrush from the Deccan. Malabar Trogon. 5(3): 13.
  7. Ramesh, C. & S. Bhupathy 2010. Breeding Biology of Python molurus molurus Linn. (1758) (Family: Boidae) in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, India. Herpetological Journal 20:157-163.
  8. Ramesh & S. Bhupathy 2010. A report on the unusual body weight of a hatchling Python molurus molurus. Reptile Rap 10:22-23.
  9. Das, I. & Bhupathy, S. 2010. Geoclemys hamiltonii (Gray 1830) – spotted pond turtle, black pond turtle. In: Rhodin, A.G.J., Pritchard, P.C.H., van Dijk, P.P., Saumure, R.A., Buhlmann, K.A., Iverson, J.B., and Mittermeier, R.A. (Eds.). Conservation Biology of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises: A Compilation Project of the IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group. Chelonian Research Monographs No. 5, pp. 043.1–043.6, doi:10.3854/crm.5.043. hamiltonii.v1.2010,http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/cbftt/.
  10. Subramanian Bhupathy et Kurt A Buhlmann 2010. Le Trionyx à clapets de l’Inde Lissemys punctata (Bonnaterre, 1789): Indian Flapshell Turtle). Chéloniens 18: 24-28.
  11. Nikhil Raj, P.P., J. Ranjini, R. Dhanya, J. Subramanian, P.A. Azeez & S. Bhupathy 2010. Consolidated checklist of birds in the Pallikaranai Wetlands, Chennai, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(8):1114-1118.
  12. Basundhara Chettri & S. Bhupathy 2010. Three little known reptile species from the Araku Valley, Eastern Ghats with notes on their distribution. Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(8):1109-1113.
  13. Basundhara Chettri, S. Bhupathy & Bhoj Kumar Acharya 2009. Morphometry and aspects of breeding biology of Trachischium gentheri Boulenger, 1890 (Serpentes: Colubridae) in North Sikkim, Eastern Himalaya, India. Russian Journal of Herpetology 16(3):177-182.
  14. Bhupathy, S., Basundhara Chettri & Aaron M. Bauer 2009. Rediscovery and Revalidation of Takydromus sikkimensis (Günther, 1888) (Squamata: Lacertidae) from Sikkim, India. Journal of Herpetology 43(2): 267-274.
  15. Srinivas, G., S. Bhupathy & Suganthan R Sakthivel 2009. Rhacophorus pseudomalabaricus. Herpetological Review 40 (3): 362.
  16. Ramesh, C. & S. Bhupathy 2009. Yawning in Python molurus. Hamadryad 34 (1): 179-180.
  17. Shreyas Krishnan, S. Bhupathy & Devi Prasad 2009. Monitoring of Python molurus molurus in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan. Hamadryad 34(1): 28-33.
  18. Das, I. & Bhupathy, S. 2009. Melanochelys trijuga (Schweigger 1812) – Indian black turtle. In: Rhodin, A.G.J., Pritchard, P.C.H., van Dijk, P.P., Saumure, R.A., Buhlmann, K.A., Iverson, J.B., and Mittermeier, R.A. (Eds.). Conservation Biology of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises: A Compilation Project of the IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group. Chelonian Research Monographs No. 5, pp. 038.1–038.9, doi:10.3854/crm.5.038.trijuga.v1.2009, http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/cbftt/.
  19. Das, I. & Bhupathy, S. 2009. Hardella thurjii (Gray 1831) – crowned river turtle. In: Rhodin, A.G.J., Pritchard, P.C.H., van Dijk, P.P., Saumure, R.A., Buhlmann, K.A., Iverson, J.B., and Mittermeier, R.A. (Eds.). Conservation Biology of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises: A Compilation Project of the IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group. Chelonian Research Monographs No. 5, pp. 023.1-023.6, doi:10.3854/crm.5.023.thurjii.v1.2009, http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/cbftt/.
  20. Basundhara Chettri & S. Bhupathy 2009. Occurrence of Dinodon gammiei (Blanford, 1878) in Sikkim, Eastern Himalaya, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 1(1):60-61.
  21. Kannan, P. & S. Bhupathy 2009. Spatial distribution pattern of Agamid lizards (Family: Agamidae) in the Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu, India. J. Science Transactions in Environment and Technovation 3(1): 41-47.
  22. Srinivas, G., S. Bhupathy & A. Madhivanan 2008. Occurrence of Salea anamallayana Beddome, 1878 in High Wavy Mountains, Western Ghats. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 105(3): 193-194.
  23. Bhupathy, S. 2007. Monitoring of marine turtles along the Kerala and Tamil Nadu coasts. Indian Ocean Turtle Newsletter 5: 1-9.
  24. Basundhara Chettri & S. Bhupathy 2007. Reptile Fauna of Sikkim with Emphasis to Teesta Valley, Eastern Himalayas, India. Journal of Hill Research. 20 (1): 1-6.
  25. Mukherjee, D. & S. Bhupathy 2007. A New Species of Wolf Snake (Serpentes: Colubridae: Lycodon) from Anaikatti Hills, Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India. Russian Journal of Herpetology 14(1): 21-26.
  26. Bhupathy, S, J. Subramanean & M. Vijay 2007. Nesting of Lepidochelys olivacea along the South Chennai coast with emphasis on habitat characteristics. Hamadryad 31(2): 274-280.
  27. Nixon, A.M.A. & S. Bhupathy 2007. Occurrence of Melanobatrachus indicus Beddome, 1878 in Mathikettan Shola, Western Ghats. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 104(1): 105-106.
  28. Mukherjee, D., A. M. A. Nixon & S. Bhupathy 2006. Observations on the morphometry of two subspecies of Melanochelys trijuga from the Western Ghats, Southwestern India. International Turtle and Tortoise Newsletter 9: 6-9.
  29. Bhupathy, S. & S. Saravanan 2006. Status of Marine Turtles of Gulf of Mannar, India. J. Chelonian Conservation and Biology 5(1):139-141.
  30. Bhupathy, S. M. Vijay, A.M.A. Nixon, J. Subramanean, R. Karunakaran & J. Gokulakrishnan 2006. The status of turtle populations on the Tamil Nadu and Kerala coasts. In: Towards an integrated and collaborative sea turtle conservation programme in India: a UNEP/CMS- IOSEA Project Report (eds. K. Shanker and H.V. Andrews). Centre for Herpetology/ Madras Crocodile Bank Trust, Post bag 4, Mamallapuram, Tamil Nadu.
  31. Bhupathy, S. & S. Saravanan 2006. Marine Turtles of Tamil Nadu. In: Marine Turtles of India. B.C. Choudhury and K. Shankar (Eds.) Oxford University Press, Mumbai.
  32. Basundhara Chettri, S. Bhupathy & B. K. Acharya 2010. Distribution pattern of reptiles along an eastern Himalayan elevation gradient, India. Acta Oecologica 36(1): 16-22.
  33. Bhupathy, S. 2009. Status, Distribution and Ecology of the Indian Flapshell Turtle, Lissemys punctata. Pp. 91-94. In: Vasudevan, K. (Ed.). Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises of India. ENVIS Bulletin: Wildlife and Protected Areas, Vol. 12(1). Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India.

2000-2005

  1. Debanik Mukherjee, S. Bhupathy & A. M.A. Nixon 2005. A new species of day gecko (Squamata, Gekkonidae, Cnemaspis) from the Anaikatti Hills, Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India. Current Science 89(8): 1326-1327.
  2. Bhupathy, S. 2004. Reptiles. In. Tamil Nadu Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan. Chordate Diversity. R. Annamalai (Ed). Tamil Nadu Forest Department, Chennai. pp. 62-75.
  3. Mukherjee, D. & S. Bhupathy 2004. Snake diversity of Anaikatti Hills, Western Ghats, India. In. National Workshop on Biodiversity Resources Management and Sustainable use. (Ed) .K. Muthuchelian, Proc. Workshop, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India. pp. 315‑317.
  4. Nixon, A.M.A. & S. Bhupathy 2004. Impact of plantations on the reptile diversity in Upper Nilgiris, Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, Western Ghats. In. National Workshop on Biodiversity Resources Management and Sustainable use. K. Muthuchelian (Ed). Proc. Workshop, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India. pp. 311‑314.
  5. Mukherjee, D. & S. Bhupathy 2004. Uropeltis ellioti in the diet of Naja naja. Hamadryad 28 (1&2): 109-110.
  6. Bhupathy, S. & S. Saravanan 2003. Exploitation of sea turtles along the southeast coast of Tamil Nadu, India. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 100 (2&3): 628-631.
  7. Bhupathy, S. & R. Karunakaran 2003. Conservation of Olive ridley sea turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea (Reptilia/Chelonia) along the Nagapattinam coast, southeast coast of India. Indian Journal of Marine Sciences 32(2): 158-171.
  8. Bhupathy, S. & Saravanan, S. 2002. A report on the status of sea turtles along the Tamil Nadu coast. In: Proc. of the National Workshop for the Development of a National Sea Turtle Conservation Action Plan, Bhubaneswar, Orissa. B. C. Choudhury and Karthik Shanker (Eds.). Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. pp 70-74.
  9. Bhupathy, S. & Banugopan, K. 2002. Impact of habitat alterations on the reptile diversity in the higher altitudes of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. Biosphere Reserves in India and their Management. In: Proc. of the Review meeting: Biosphere and their Management. 8-11, September 2000. P.S. Easa, J.K. Sharma and R. K. Rai (Eds.) Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi. p. 114 -116.
  10. Bhupathy, S. & S. Saravanan 2002. Status of sea turtles along the Tamil Nadu coast, India. Kachhapa 7: 7-13.
  11. Bhupathy, S. & A.M.A. Nixon 2002. Communal nesting of Cnemaspis indica in Mukuruthi National Park, Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, Western Ghats, India. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc 99(2): 330-332.
  12. Rajasekaran, A., Arun, P.R., Azeez, P.A. & S. Bhupathy 2002. Ecological observations on Baphilimali Hill and its environs, Orissa. Proc. National Seminar on Conservation of Eastern Ghats, March 24-26, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh.
  13. Arun, P.R., Rajasekaran, A., Azeez, P.A. & S. Bhupathy 2002. Impact of anthropogenic pressure on the biodiversity of Kolli Hills, Eastern Ghats. Proc. National Seminar on Conservation of Eastern Ghats, March 24-26, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh.
  14. Nixon, A.M.A. & Bhupathy, S. 2001. Notes on the occurrence of Dhaman (Ptyas mucosus) in the higher altitudes of Nilgiris, Western Ghats. Cobra 44: 30-31.

1995-2000

  1. Bhupathy, B.C. Choudhury, F. Hanfee, Kalyar, S.M.M.H. Khan, S.G. Platt & S.M.A. Rashid 2000. Turtle trade in South Asia: Regional Summary (Bangladesh, India and Myanmar). In: Asian turtle trade: Proceedings of a workshop on conservation and trade of freshwater turtles and tortoises in Asia. PP van Dijk, BL Stuart and AGJ Rhodin (Eds). Chelonian Research Monograph 2: 101-105. Chelonian Research Foundation, USA.
  2. Choudhury, B.C., Bhupathy, S. & F. Hanfee 2000. Status information on the tortoises and freshwater turtles of India. In: Asian turtle trade: Proceedings of a workshop on conservation and trade of freshwater turtles and tortoises in Asia. PP van Dijk, BL Stuart and AGJ Rhodin (Eds). Chelonian Research Monograph 2: 86-94. Chelonian Research Foundation, USA.
  3. Bhupathy, S. & V.S. Vijayan 1999. Aspects of the wintering ecology of Purple Moorhens (Porphyrio porphyrio) in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, India. PAVO 37 (1): 109-118.
  4. Bhupathy, S. 1999. Reptile fauna of Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc 96: 475-77.
  5. Bhupathy, S., Vijayan, V.S & Reena Mathur 1998. Population ecology of migratory waterfowl in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 95(2): 287-294.
  6. Kannan, P. & S. Bhupathy 1997. Occurrence of Elliot’s Shieldtail snake in Anaikatti Hills, Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. Cobra 28: 34-35.
  7. .Bhupathy, S. 1997. Conservation of the Endangered River Terrapin Batagur baska in the Sunderbans of West Bengal. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 94: 27-35.
  8. Kannan, P. & S. Bhupathy 1997. Breeding data of some agamid lizards from the Western Ghats. Hamadryad 22: 56-57.
  9. Kannan, P. & S. Bhupathy 1996. Breeding season of Horse-shoe Pit Viper (Trimeresurus strigatus) in Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 93: 592.

1990-1995

  1. Bhupathy, S. & B. C. Choudhury 1995. Status, distribution and conservation of the Travancore Tortoise, Indotestudo forstenii in Western Ghats. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 92 (1):16-21.
  2. Bhupathy, S. 1995. Reptile fauna of Indian Sunderban, West Bengal. Cobra 22: 11-13.
  3. Bhupathy, S. 1995. Distribution of Python molurus bivittatus in India Cobra 21: 2-5.
  4. Bhupathy, S. & V. S. Vijayan 1994. Aestivation of turtles in Keoladeo National Park with special reference to Lissemys punctata. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 91 (3): 91(3): 398-402.
  5. Bhupathy, S. & B. C. Choudhury 1994. A note on the reproductive biology of the Spotted pond turtle, Geoclemys hamiltonii. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 91(1): 146-147.
  6. Bhupathy, S. 1994. The distribution of Asian Brown Tortoise Manouria emys in India and the taxonomic status of subspecies. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 91(1):147-149.
  7. Bhupathy, S. C. S. Silori & S. F. Wesley Sunderraj 1994. Additional locality records for two Indian tortoise species. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 91(1): 149-150.
  8. Bhupathy, S. 1993. A note on the breeding of the Indian python Python molurus in the wild. Cobra 13: 6-7.
  9. Bhupathy, S. & V. S. Vijayan 1993. Aspects of feeding ecology of Lissemys punctata (Testudines: Trionichidae) in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, India. Hamadryad 18:13-16.
  10. Bhupathy, S. 1993. Food of Indian tent turtle (Kachuga tentoria circumdata) in captivity. Zoos’ Print 8(11): 4-5.
  11. Choudhury, B.C. & S. Bhupathy 1992. An inventory of freshwater turtles and land tortoises in captivity in Indian Zoos: Results of a Survey. Zoos’ Print 7 (12): 4-10.
  12. Bhupathy, S. & V. S. Vijayan 1991. Freshwater turtle fauna of eastern Rajasthan. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 88(1): 118-122.

1985-1990

  1. Bhupathy, S. 1990. Blotch structure in individual identification of the Indian Python (Python molurus molurus) and its possible usage in population estimation. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 87 (3): 399‑404.
  2. Sivasubramanian, C. & S. Bhupathy 1990. Indian flap-shell turtle Lissemys punctata (Lacepede) in the food of Adjutant stork Leptoptilus dubius. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 87(3): 460.
  3. Bhupathy, S. 1990. Observations on the food of Ganges Soft‑ shell Turtle, Trionyx gangeticus in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 87(3): 460‑461.
  4. Bhupathy, S. & V. S. Vijayan 1989. Status, distribution and general ecology of the Indian Python (Python molurus molurus Linn.) in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 86 (3): 381‑387.
  5. Bhupathy, S. 1989. Morphometry of the Indian Flap ‑ shell Turtle (Lissemys punctata andersoni). J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 86 (2): 252.
  6. Bhupathy, S. & C. R. Ajith Kumar 1988. On the identity and occurrence of the Peacock Soft shell (Trionyx hurum) in Rajasthan. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 85 (3): 624.
  7. Bhupathy, S. 1987. Occurrence of the Bicoloured Leaf-nosed Bat (Hipposideoros fulvus) in Rajasthan. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 84: 199‑200.
  8. Bhupathy, S. & M. N. Haque 1986. Association of Indian Rock Python (Python molurus) with Porcupine (Hystrix indica) J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 83 (2): 449‑450.